Wednesday, 26 July 2017

Will it escape the predators

Luckily I wasn't at Leighton moss this morning where the following photos where taken, because here in Penrith it was like the monsoon season, extremely wet and warm with it, so my self and the Westies  got rather wet.  It was a good towelling down when we got back, then I did the Westies LOL.
   So pics from a resent trip to Leighton Moss, and another instance when the lens wasn't quite up to the job.

Possibly the male of the two Oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus) which were ----------------------


Guarding a chick , reasonably well camouflaged.

And it looks like it wants to be fed.
But oh dear mum walks away leaving the offspring rather expose to predators.
But a persistent youngster brings her back to finds it some tit-bits
Or maybe just a lesson in how to find your own.
Either way lets hope it survives the predators.






Wednesday, 19 July 2017

Distance is a problem

Spoonbill (Platalea leucorodia) quite a distance from the Eric Morecambe Hide Leighton Moss

A little bit more obliging , not a lot.
     

I know you didn't think I was a Spoon, so I had to prove it, I really have got a spoon shaped bill.
    I need a bigger lens !!


                   

Sunday, 16 July 2017

Lancashire, and a few Gulls.

Black-headed Gulls nesting, and some chicks on show, at the Allen hide Leighton Moss



Black-headed Gull (Larus ridibundus) lets make some noise.

sitting tight on nest.



Lots more on another island.

Saturday, 8 July 2017

Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus)

Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus)

Giving the feathers a service.




A bit of yoga thrown in.

What big feet you have.

Tuesday, 4 July 2017

Lord's Island Derwenteater.

As my mate Les steered the launch past Lord's Island on Derwentwater He slowed the boat down slightly to see if there was anything to be seen. Now in a previous post visitors  may remember seeing photos of , and reading about the Barnacle geese that come to the Island to breed , which in itself is quite an unusual thing as normally they breed way up near the Arctic. Well a couple where showing again and realising it had been some time since we saw the last pair, we were expecting maybe some goslings.

As I have pointed out before we can't get any closer because the boat needs a certain depth of water, so I have to rely on my lens to help out. and can anyone see the gosling.



Now we can , amazingly blending in with the boulders.
Also on the Island a lone Oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus)

And at the top end of the Lake a Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) on the lookout for anything edible.